Features, Monthly TBRs

March 2019 TBR

March19TBR

Welcome to my crazy ambitious March TBR!  March is going to (hopefully) be a crazy hectic reading month for me.  Not only is March #WomensHistoryMonth AND #MiddleGradeMarch, but I also agreed to a buddy read AND I want to pick up a few books in preparation for an exciting author event this month… How am I going to accomplish all of this?  I am going to be reading books that will count for more than one challenge.  #Multitasking

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» Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flagg

friedgreentomatoes

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It’s first the story of two women in the 1980s, of gray-headed Mrs. Threadgoode telling her life story to Evelyn, who is in the sad slump of middle age. The tale she tells is also of two women—of the irrepressibly daredevilish tomboy Idgie and her friend Ruth, who back in the thirties ran a little place in Whistle Stop, Alabama, a Southern kind of Cafe Wobegon offering good barbecue and good coffee and all kinds of love and laughter, even an occasional murder.

This is going to be a buddy read with my good friend Jackie @Death by Tsundoku.

» Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

speak

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The first ten lies they tell you in high school.
“Speak up for yourself—we want to know what you have to say.” 
From the first moment of her freshman year at Merryweather High, Melinda knows this is a big fat lie, part of the nonsense of high school. She is friendless, outcast, because she busted an end-of-summer party by calling the cops, so now nobody will talk to her, let alone listen to her. As time passes, she becomes increasingly isolated and practically stops talking altogether. Only her art class offers any solace, and it is through her work on an art project that she is finally able to face what really happened at that terrible party: she was raped by an upperclassman, a guy who still attends Merryweather and is still a threat to her. Her healing process has just begun when she has another violent encounter with him. But this time Melinda fights back, refuses to be silent, and thereby achieves a measure of vindication. 
In Laurie Halse Anderson’s powerful novel, an utterly believable heroine with a bitterly ironic voice delivers a blow to the hypocritical world of high school. She speaks for many a disenfranchised teenager while demonstrating the importance of speaking up for oneself.
Speak was a 1999 National Book Award Finalist for Young People’s Literature.

I’m super excited to be able to attend Laurie Halse Anderson’s book tour for her new book, Shout, on the 14th of this month!  I have been meaning to pick up Speak for years, so this is the perfect opportunity.

» Wintergirls by Laurie Halse Anderson

Wintergirls

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“Dead girl walking,” the boys say in the halls.
“Tell us your secret,” the girls whisper, one toilet to another.
I am that girl.
I am the space between my thighs, daylight shining through.
I am the bones they want, wired on a porcelain frame. 
Lia and Cassie are best friends, wintergirls frozen in matchstick bodies, competitors in a deadly contest to see who can be the skinniest. But what comes after size zero and size double-zero? When Cassie succumbs to the demons within, Lia feels she is being haunted by her friend’s restless spirit.

Another book by Laurie Halse Anderson in preparation for meeting her this month!

» Aru Shah and the End of Time by Rochani Chokshi

AruShah

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Twelve-year-old Aru Shah has a tendency to stretch the truth in order to fit in at school. While her classmates are jetting off to family vacations in exotic locales, she’ll be spending her autumn break at home, in the Museum of Ancient Indian Art and Culture, waiting for her mom to return from her latest archeological trip. Is it any wonder that Aru makes up stories about being royalty, traveling to Paris, and having a chauffeur?
One day, three schoolmates show up at Aru’s doorstep to catch her in a lie. They don’t believe her claim that the museum’s Lamp of Bharata is cursed, and they dare Aru to prove it. Just a quick light, Aru thinks. Then she can get herself out of this mess and never ever fib again.
But lighting the lamp has dire consequences. She unwittingly frees the Sleeper, an ancient demon whose duty it is to awaken the God of Destruction. Her classmates and beloved mother are frozen in time, and it’s up to Aru to save them.
The only way to stop the demon is to find the reincarnations of the five legendary Pandava brothers, protagonists of the Hindu epic poem, the Mahabharata, and journey through the Kingdom of Death. But how is one girl in Spider-Man pajamas supposed to do all that?

This one counts towards #YARC2019 and for #MiddleGradeMarch!  Two birds, one stone.

»Starry River of the Sky by Grace Lin

StarryRiveroftheSky

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The moon is missing from the remote Village of Clear Sky, but only a young boy named Rendi seems to notice! Rendi has run away from home and is now working as a chore boy at the village inn. He can’t help but notice the village’s peculiar inhabitants and their problems-where has the innkeeper’s son gone? Why are Master Chao and Widow Yan always arguing? What is the crying sound Rendi keeps hearing? And how can crazy, old Mr. Shan not know if his pet is a toad or a rabbit?
But one day, a mysterious lady arrives at the Inn with the gift of storytelling, and slowly transforms the villagers and Rendi himself. As she tells more stories and the days pass in the Village of Clear Sky, Rendi begins to realize that perhaps it is his own story that holds the answers to all those questions.
Newbery Honor author Grace Lin brings readers another enthralling fantasy featuring her marvelous full-color illustrations. Starry River of the Sky is filled with Chinese folklore, fascinating characters, and exciting new adventures.

Another two-for-one that will count for both #YARC2019 and #MiddleGradeMarch

» Rad Women Worldwide: Artists and Athletes, Pirates and Punks, and Other Revolutionaries Who Shaped History by Kate Schatz

RadWomenWorldwide

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From the authors of the New York Times bestselling book Rad American Women A-Z, comes a bold new collection of 40 biographical profiles, each accompanied by a striking illustrated portrait, showcasing extraordinary women from around the world.
In Rad Women Worldwide, writer Kate Schatz and artist Miriam Klein Stahl tell fresh, engaging, and inspiring tales of perseverance and radical success by pairing well researched and riveting biographies with powerful and expressive cut-paper portraits. Featuring an array of diverse figures from Hatshepsut (the great female king who ruled Egypt peacefully for two decades) and Malala Yousafzi (the youngest person to win the Nobel Peace Prize) to Poly Styrene (legendary teenage punk and lead singer of X-Ray Spex) and Liv Arnesen and Ann Bancroft (polar explorers and the first women to cross Antarctica), this progressive and visually arresting book is a compelling addition to women’s history.

A book of mini-biographies for #WomensHistoryMonth.

» Wonder Women: 25 Innovators, Inventors, and Trailblazers Who Changed History by Sam Maggs

WonderWomen

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You may think you know women’s history pretty well, but have you ever heard of. . .
· Alice Ball, the chemist who developed an effective treatment for leprosy—only to have the credit taken by a man?
· Mary Sherman Morgan, the rocket scientist whose liquid fuel compounds blasted the first U.S. satellite into orbit?
· Huang Daopo, the inventor whose weaving technology revolutionized textile production in China—centuries before the cotton gin?
Smart women have always been able to achieve amazing things, even when the odds were stacked against them. In Wonder Women, author Sam Maggs tells the stories of the brilliant, brainy, and totally rad women in history who broke barriers as scientists, engineers, mathematicians, adventurers, and inventors. Also included are interviews with real-life women in STEM careers, an extensive bibliography, and a guide to women-centric science and technology organizations—all to show the many ways the geeky girls of today can help build the future. 

Another collection of mini-biographies for #WomensHistoryMonth.

Books For Review

» The Girls in the Picture by Melanie Benjamin

TheGirlsinthePicture

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An intimate portrait of the close friendship and powerful creative partnership between two of Hollywood’s earliest female superstars: Frances Marion and Mary Pickford. An enchanting new novel from the New York Times bestselling author of The Swans of Fifth Avenue and The Aviator’s Wife.
Hollywood, 1914. Frances Marion, a young writer desperate for a break, meets “America’s Sweetheart,” Mary Pickford, already making a name for herself both on and off the screen with her golden curls and lively spirit. Together, these two women will take the movie business by storm.
Mary Pickford becomes known as the “Queen of the Movies”—the first actor to have her name on a movie marquee, and the first to become a truly international celebrity. Mary and her husband, Douglas Fairbanks, were America’s first Royal Couple, living in a home more famous that Buckingham Palace. Mary won the first Academy Award for Best Actress in a Talkie and was the first to put her hand and footprints in Grauman’s theater sidewalk. Her annual salary in 1919 was $625,000—at a time when women’s salaries peaked at $10 a week. Frances Marion is widely considered one of the most important female screenwriters of the 20th century, and was the first writer to win multiple Academy Awards. The close personal friendship between the two stars was closely linked to their professional collaboration and success.
This is a novel about power: the power of women during the exhilarating early years of Hollywood, and the power of forgiveness. It’s also about the imbalance of power, then and now, and the sacrifices and compromises women must make in order to succeed. And at its heart, it’s a novel about the power of female friendship.

I was super excited to have been contacted by the publisher to read & review this one.  I have seen a few bloggers enjoy this one, so I already had my eye on it.

» Dragonfly Dreams by Jennifer J. Chow

DragonflyDreams

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It’s 1880 in Fresno, California when 17-year-old Topaz Woo dies after giving birth. She can get an extension in a non-physical body—if she uses The Ten Commandments to influence her newborn. Over the course of ten years, she finds herself stymied in parenting by intergenerational drama and spiritual battle. Will she adjust to an otherworldly existence and give her daughter a solid foundation? Or will she become mired in family disputes and forfeit her soul to evil? 

So this is one that has been on my NetGalley backlist for years but I keep putting it off.  I am going to squeeze it in this month since it’s only 156 pages AND it will count towards #YARC2019.

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LetsChat

Which books are on your TBR for March?

Have you read any of the books on my list?  If so, what did you think?

Comment below & let me know 🙂

12 thoughts on “March 2019 TBR”

  1. I took a literature class in college that was a combo of books and film. We would read a novel and then watch the movie in class and talk about them. I know Fried Green Tomatoes had been on the syllabus, but was removed because we ran out of time. Professors are always overly-ambitious (I should know, lol).

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    1. So did you ever get the chance to read it? I haven’t read it OR seen the film. I *think* Jackie has seen the film. I may try and watch the film before Jackie and I meet to discuss the book so we can talk about the book vs. the film adaptation.

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      1. I never did! I was taking way too many classes at the time, so I just gave it to my mom (I think). I’m sure I saw the film, but it’s been about 100 years, so I don’t remember much.

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  2. This is a great TBR! I haven’t read any of these books, but heard a lot of good things about Speak, I hope you’ll enjoy it 🙂 Happy reading, Amanda! ❤ ❤

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  3. Pingback: April 2019 TBR

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