Features, Monthly TBRs

May 2019 TBR

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Hello bookworms!

I’m back today to share which books I am planning on reading in the month of May.  I read 5 out of the 6 books on my April TBR, so I thought I’d keep this TBR short and sweet too.

I am going to try and prioritize a few NetGalley back list books this month since I didn’t read any in March or April.

Let’s see what I’m planning on reading this month…

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» Wicked Saints (Something Dark and Holy #1) by Emily A. Duncan

WickedSaints

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A girl who can speak to gods must save her people without destroying herself.
A prince in danger must decide who to trust.
A boy with a monstrous secret waits in the wings.
Together, they must assassinate the king and stop the war.
In a centuries-long war where beauty and brutality meet, their three paths entwine in a shadowy world of spilled blood and mysterious saints, where a forbidden romance threatens to tip the scales between dark and light. Wicked Saints is the thrilling start to Emily A. Duncan’s devastatingly Gothic Something Dark and Holy trilogy.

As I am posting this TBR, I only have 6 days until this book is due at the library… I can’t renew it, so I’m going to do my best to squeeze it in before I have to return in.  Keep your fingers crossed for me.

» Darius the Great is Not Okay by Adib Khorram

DariustheGreatisNotOkay

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Darius doesn’t think he’ll ever be enough, in America or in Iran.
Darius Kellner speaks better Klingon than Farsi, and he knows more about Hobbit social cues than Persian ones. He’s about to take his first-ever trip to Iran, and it’s pretty overwhelming–especially when he’s also dealing with clinical depression, a disapproving dad, and a chronically anemic social life. In Iran, he gets to know his ailing but still formidable grandfather, his loving grandmother, and the rest of his mom’s family for the first time. And he meets Sohrab, the boy next door who changes everything.
Sohrab makes sure people speak English so Darius can understand what’s going on. He gets Darius an Iranian National Football Team jersey that makes him feel like a True Persian for the first time. And he understands that sometimes, best friends don’t have to talk. Darius has never had a true friend before, but now he’s spending his days with Sohrab playing soccer, eating rosewater ice cream, and sitting together for hours in their special place, a rooftop overlooking the Yazdi skyline.
Sohrab calls him Darioush–the original Persian version of his name–and Darius has never felt more like himself than he does now that he’s Darioush to Sohrab. When it’s time to go home to America, he’ll have to find a way to be Darioush on his own.

This was the only book off my April TBR that I did not get to!  I am reading this for #YARC2019 AND that it will count for my goal of reading 30 books off my physical TBR.

Books For Review

» Five Roses by Alice Zorn

FiveRoses

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A sister. A baby. A man who watches from the trees.
Fara and her husband buy a house with a disturbing history that reawakens memories of her own family tragedy. Maddy still lives in the house, once a hippie commune, where her daughter was kidnapped twenty-seven years ago. Rose grew up isolated with her mother in the backwoods north of Montreal. Now in the city, she questions the silence and deception that shaped her upbringing.
Fara, Maddy, and Rose meet in Montreal’s historic Pointe St-Charles, a rundown neighbourhood on the cusp of gentrification. Against a backdrop of abandonment, loss, and revitalization, the women must confront troubling secrets in order to rebuild their lives. Zorn deftly interweaves the rich yet fragile lives of three very different people into a story of strength and friendship.

» A Gown of Thorns by Natalie Meg Evans

AGownOfThorns

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A bittersweet romantic novella set in the rolling valleys of the French Dordogne wine-making region.
Shauna Vincent, a graduate from the north of England, has just learned that the job she set her heart on has gone to a socially well-connected rival. Devastated, she accepts an offer in France from an old family friend – to be au pair to the woman’s grandchildren. Within a week, Shauna is deep in the Dordogne. With little to do other than organise her two charges’ busy social diaries, she has endless hours in which to explore the magical landscape that surrounds her. Her new home is the ancient Chateau de Chemignac with its vineyards and hidden secrets, including a locked tower room where she unearths a trove of vintage gowns, one of which feels unsettlingly familiar. Then Shauna falls asleep one afternoon in a valley full of birdsong, and has a strange dream of a vintage aircraft circling threateningly overhead. So when she suddenly awakes to find charming local landowner Laurent de Chemignac standing over her – Shauna wonders if the dashing aristocrat might be just the person to help her untangle this unexpected message from the past.

» Liar by Rob Roberge

Liar

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An intense memoir about mental illness, memory and storytelling, from an acclaimed novelist.
When Rob Roberge learns that he’s likely to have developed a progressive memory-eroding disease from years of hard living and frequent concussions, he is terrified by the prospect of becoming a walking shadow. In a desperate attempt to preserve his identity, he sets out to (somewhat faithfully) record the most formative moments of his life—ranging from the brutal murder of his childhood girlfriend, to a diagnosis of rapid-cycling bipolar disorder, to opening for famed indie band Yo La Tengo at The Fillmore in San Francisco. But the process of trying to remember his past only exposes just how fragile the stories that lay at the heart of our self-conception really are.
As Liar twists and turns through Roberge’s life, it turns the familiar story of sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll on its head. Darkly funny and brutally frank, it offers a remarkable portrait of a down and out existence cobbled together across the country, from musicians’ crashpads around Boston, to seedy bars popular with sideshow freaks in Florida, to a painful moment of reckoning in the scorched Wonder Valley desert of California. As Roberge struggles to keep addiction and mental illness from destroying the good life he has built in his better moments, he is forced to acknowledge the increasingly blurred line between the lies we tell others and the lies we tell ourselves.

Book Club Selection

» The Muralist by B.A. Shapiro

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From the author of the New York Times bestseller The Art Forgercomes a thrilling new novel of art, history, love, and politics that traces the life and mysterious disappearance of a brilliant young artist on the eve of World War II.
Alizée Benoit, an American painter working for the Works Progress Administration (WPA), vanishes in New York City in 1940 amid personal and political turmoil. No one knows what happened to her. Not her Jewish family living in German-occupied France. Not her artistic patron and political compatriot, Eleanor Roosevelt. Not her close-knit group of friends, including Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, and Lee Krasner. And, some seventy years later, not her great-niece, Danielle Abrams, who while working at Christie’s auction house uncovers enigmatic paintings hidden behind recently found works by those now famous Abstract Expressionist artists. Do they hold answers to the questions surrounding her missing aunt?
Entwining the lives of both historical and fictional characters, and moving between the past and the present, The Muralist plunges readers into the divisiveness of prewar politics and the largely forgotten plight of European refugees refused entrance to the United States. It captures both the inner workings of today’s New York art scene and the beginnings of the vibrant and quintessentially American school of Abstract Expressionism.
B.A. Shapiro is a master at telling a gripping story while exploring provocative themes. In Alizée and Danielle she has created two unforgettable women, artists both, who compel us to ask, What happens when luminous talent collides with inexorable historical forces? Does great art have the power to change the world? And to what lengths should a person go to thwart evil?

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LetsChat

Which books are on your TBR for May?

Have you read any of the books on my list?  If so, what did you think?

Comment below & let me know 🙂

13 thoughts on “May 2019 TBR”

    1. Sounds Like Titanic… I had to look that one up based off that title! What an interesting premise! Who is the composer? I assume you find out at some point in the book… Was it who you thought it was? Did you enjoy the book?

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      1. You totally don’t learn who The Composer is — she just keeps referring to him as The Composer. However, if you Google the book title, loads of people have theories about who he is. I linked one article that seems pretty confident about his true identity in the review.

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    1. Ooooo I’ve never read any of Daphne du Maurier’s books! I’ve been recommended Rebecca SOOOOO many times, but have yet to give it a go… It has been compared to one of my favorite books ever, Jane Eyre, so I am a little nervous it won’t live up to my expectations… I assume you’ve read it?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Aww ❤ I hope you will enjoy it! It's dark, bloody and has a gothic feel… Some romance too, but overall I really enjoyed it.

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